FAQ/Help

FAQ/Help is a simple, easy, quick way to find answers to the questions below.

What can I do with ONS?

You can explore neighbourhoods by reviewing data tables and viewing interactive maps that will tell you about important health indicators for the area. For example, you can learn the average distance people commute to work.

What area is included in ONS?

The entire City of Ottawa is covered.

What will I find in a neighbourhood profile?

Each neighbourhood profile has a similar format. The profile begins with a description of the neighbourhood boundaries and key features, and includes a map of the area. Data tables provide detailed information on Age & Population, Child Care, Community Resources, Education & Labour, Families & Households, Food Access, Health of Residents, Housing, Immigration, Culture & Ethnicity, Income, Parks & Recreation, School Access, Socio-economic status (SES), and Walkability.

How do I find my neighbourhood?

You can find your neighbourhood using the interactive map on the ONS Home page, select a neighbourhood from the list of profiles, or select your neighbourhood by using Zoom on Maps. Or, just use the handy Locate Me button on the maps page.

What information can be shown on the map?

You can use pre-defined filters to change your view of the Ottawa neighbourhoods on the maps page. Each filter category is associated with a list of indicators and variables. You will see information about your selected categories when you hover your mouse over a neighbourhood on the map. You can also add symbols to the map for available community services and resources such as schools, libraries, and recreation facilities.

How can I compare neighbourhoods?

  • Click the Explore Neighbourhoods tab and go to the Maps page.
  • Click the Compare tab on the map.
  • Use the drop-down menus to select a category (for example, Families and Households), then select an indicator under that category (for example, Marital Status), and finally select a variable (for example, % Divorced) and View the chart that compares all the Ottawa neighbourhoods.
  • If you want to select particular neighbourhoods for comparison (for example the rural communities of Metcalfe, Vars, and Carp) use the check boxes in the list that appears with the map.

Why is my community shown as being part of that neighbourhood?

Small communities cannot be described separately by the ONS because the population size is too small to create reliable estimates for many measures. Unfortunately, when small communities are included in larger neighbourhoods their unique character may be lost. This is a shortcoming of studies of this kind. Those who are using the ONS to help inform their planning decisions need to understand that the neighbourhoods described here may hide the unique strengths and challenges of some distinct communities or neighbourhoods within them. The ONS should be regarded as only one source of information; other sources that help identify these variations also need to be considered as part of any decision making process.

Does each neighbourhood profile include the same information?

Yes. ONS describes each neighbourhood using the same data categories, indicators and variables. However, each of Ottawa’s neighbourhoods has its own unique strengths and challenges.

Why isn’t the data from this year available?

ONS data comes for a wide variety of sources. Each source has a different process for gathering their information and releasing it. For example, Statistics Canada will review and analysis the census data over a number of years and release detailed information over a four year schedule between censuses. Currently, ONS data comes from the 2011 Canada Census Profile and the National Household Survey, National Capital Commission, City of Ottawa, Ottawa Public Health, Ottawa Police Service, Parent Resource Centre (Early Development Index), geospatial data from DMTI, Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System (RRFSS), the Better Outcomes Registry and Network (BORN Information System), hospital discharge abstracts, commercial and public sector directories, satellite and spatial imaging, web research, phone research, bike research. Regardless of the source, ONS is committed to update the data here as soon as possible.

Providing information

How do I contribute data?

Click Contact ONS under the ONS Info tab. Use the form provided to tell us about the data that you would like to contribute. If you have a mobile device – smartphone, tablet, etc – download and install the EnvirONS app from Google Play. (EnvirONS is not currently available for iOS.)

How can I submit a correction to a neighbourhood profile?

Click Contact ONS under the ONS Info tab. Use the form provided to tell us about the correction for the neighbourhood. If you have a mobile device – smartphone, tablet, etc – download and install the EnvirONS app from Google Play. (EnvirONS is not currently available for iOS.)

Can I volunteer to maintain a neighbourhood profile?

Yes, absolutely. Nobody knows a neighbourhood better than someone who lives, works or plays there. We encourage ONS users to help us to better describe the neighbourhoods – the history, outstanding features, points of pride, etc. Click Contact ONS under the ONS Info tab. Use the form provided to tell us that you want to maintain a neighbourhood profile.

If the information I want is not available, can I request a new topic?

Click Contact ONS under the ONS Info tab. Use the form provided to tell us about the information that you have been looking for but have been unable to find here. Tell us as much as possible about the topic that you would like ONS to explore. If you know where the data that you would like to see incorporated can be obtained, make sure to include this information in your request.

Who provides the data?

ONS data comes for a wide variety of sources. Currently, ONS data comes from the 2011 Canada Census Profile and the National Household Survey, National Capital Commission, City of Ottawa, Ottawa Public Health, Ottawa Police Service, Parent Resource Centre (Early Development Index), geospatial data from DMTI, Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System (RRFSS), the Better Outcomes Registry and Network (BORN Information System), hospital discharge abstracts, commercial and public sector directories, satellite and spatial imaging, web research, phone research, bike research.

Is this site safe for my kids?

No internet site can ever be guaranteed to be kid-safe but we have tried to ensure that children will not be adversely impacted by the content that we have developed. The information on this site comes from a variety of sources. We recommend exploring the ONS with your child and discussing how where someone lives, works and plays can make a difference to one’s health and wellbeing.

Other questions

Who owns ONS?

The Ottawa Neighbourhood Study is based at the the Centre for Research and Education in Community ServiceS (CRECS) at the University of Ottawa. The university joined with community and public sector partners to  set the focus and direction of the research. The work of the ONS team is guided by a Steering Committee with representatives from the University of Ottawa, City of Ottawa, Ottawa Public Health, United Way/Centraide Ottawa, Champlain Local Health Integration Network, Parent Resource Centre, and the Ottawa Coalition of Community Health and Resource Centres.

What is ONS?

ONS stands for Ottawa Neighbourhood Study. Our goal is to better understand the neighbourhoods in which we live, work and play in order to offer evidence about the dimensions that are important for community health and well-being. We also provide the City of Ottawa, health service providers, social service agencies, community organizations and residents with information on 104 neighbourhoods in Ottawa in order to help them to identify what is working well, and where community development is needed.

Who are the ONS team?

The ONS team brings together the University of Ottawa, City of Ottawa, Ottawa Public Health, United Way/Centraide Ottawa, Champlain Local Health Integration Network, Parent Resource Centre, Community Health and Resource Centres, and other community-based partners. The Ottawa Neighbourhood Study is based at the the Centre for Research and Education in Community ServiceS (CRECS) at the University of Ottawa.